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sedarlso >> nunca le he dado antialerg o antialergicos >> de acuerdo a la academia de p pediatria, aunque padres recu e recurren a academias anticrip e anticripales para que los niÑos se tranquilicen, esta es una a practica peligrosa >> hay varias sobredosis que n ponen en peligro la vida de los niÑos y fatalidades con las m medicinas, la gente que usual n usualmenet usa, porque al gente usa, y conoce, saben que dan e sueÑo, pero no es recomentable >> esta cientificamente compr a comprobado por estudios que n g ningÚn otro sonido afeta las o emociones como el llanto de un b bebÉ >> fastidia a pocos >> esta pareja tiene 2 bebes de 5 y 15 meses y dicen que viajan frecuentemente entre connecticut y arizona. >> a la gente le molesta cuando los niÑsos llora, por eso nos n sentamos en la parte de atrÁs >> los pasajeros debemos saber q que los niÑos son niÑos, debemos ser pacientes >> desde nueva york, telemundo. >> al regresar en el noticia telemundo, impresionantes imag n imagei imÁgenes que siguen llegando de argentina, donde medio centenar de personas murieron u> ¿po
interesting here about how not working and the revolving door can work when it comes to academia and in particular, liberals. so she's not teachin teaching a political science class. she's teaching a social work class about what it's like for families to deal with all the trials and tribulations after a person has a family member coming out of jail. i guess she has a little bit of personal experience on that, but the left found her a job, okay. so if you can find a place in academia to get tenure, that would be -- it doesn't matter if you can teach on the merits of something or not. she's not teaching about political science. the baby boomer revisionist history of what happened in the '60s is coming to full light. robert redford, you could either go to hollywood or go to academia. >> it's not really -- well, when you say revisionist history, again, i repeat a small percentage. >> look at the cbs example. >> but listen. can i just -- never mind. >> why are we acting like this is okay? i don't care if she paid the time or not. she's a criminal, a disgusting human being. >> it's a q
madre. >>> usted dijo que si la academia mira el trabajo piensa que debe merecer un oscar. sabe cÓmo se preparo para este visitaba mucho a las prisioneras adentro de las cÁrceles, cuando estaba en su viaje pasaba a verlas y trabajar con ellas, y tratar de traer esperanza, ella era la tÉcnica de esta parte de la pelÍcula, sabia bien todo lo que hacÍamos. y nos ayudÓ. y luego cuando comenzÓ a actuar supimos que la disciplina y la Ó. >>> se lo tomÓ muy en serio. >>> la escena final es una maramar maravilla, y si la academia va a ver esa pelÍcula gana la nominaciÓn. >>> ojalÁ asÍ sea. la cita es el 19 de abril filly brown, y tambiÉn apoyar al talento latino. y un proyecto que es de familia, una historia de familia y de poder soÑar. el doctor, su hijo. >>> sÍ, y se van a reir mucho, tambiÉn porque hay mucha comedia tambiÉn. >>> la cita es el 19 de abril con filly brown. gracias. >>> gracias. >>> bÁrbara. >>> a apoyar a este elenco. gracias a james por estar aquÍ. y vamos a cambiar de tema, anthony santos y todo por una frase que pronunciÓ anoche cual cuando recibiÓ un pr
entrevistas que el papel en el trabajo de jenny si la academia logra ver el trabajo piensa que deberÍa merecer una nominaciÓn al oscar, como sabe como ella se preparo para el debut en la pantalla grande? >>> ella sabÍa muy bien de lo que se trata en la cÁrcel porque ella visitaba mucho a las presioneras en la cÁrceles iba cuando estaba en su viaje cantando y todo pasaba a verlas y trabajar con ellas y tratar de traer esperanza para ella y ella era la tÉcnica de esta parte de la pelÍcula, ella sabia muy bien todo lo que estÁbamos haciendo y nos ayudÓ, y luego cuando comenzÓ actuar supimos bien que la disciplina y la concentraciÓn que ella tenÍa cantando se la trajo a la actuaciÓn. >>> se lo tomÓ en serio se preparÓ intensamente para el papel. >>> es la escena final es una maravilla en esa escena no mÁs les digo que si la academia va a ver esa pelÍcula en ese momento va a ganar la nominaciÓn. >>> ojalÁ asÍ sea y tambiÉn a todos los fanÁticos y las personas que quieren mucho a jenny la cita es el 19 de abril con el elenco y tambiÉn apoyar al talento latino y tambiÉn al proy
" while you travel. >> host: so let's talk a little bit about academia. you were a professor and a student, and you see academia as part of the problem in establishing this secular liberal world view. >> guest: yes. obviously, that sounds an all too familiar rhythm here. people have said that for some time who have a conservative bent. the thing is that they generally misdiagnose where the problem took hold. we think that the 1960s was the big, radical break, and if you do a little research, what you find out was really the 1860s. and that's, the situation i'm about to describe is how liberalism came to.com that it the culture inte -- dominate the culture intellectually. so that to be educated meant to take on the liberal view and not to take on the liberal view must mean that you were not educated. what occurred was this, a very special circumstance. in europe you've got the development of the universities along the radical enlightenment lines by the time you get to the 1900s. i'm sorry, the 1800s. especially in germany. so all the latest enlightenment, radical enlightenment thought had r
american women at the high levels of business, academia, government, but as we have seen in recent months, we are still asking age-old questions about having to make a woman's way in a male-dominated field. the economist magazine recently published what it called a glass ceiling index. ranking countries with equal pay. the united states was not even in the top 10. recent studies have found that on average, women with shorter lives -- live shorter lives in america than any other industrialized country. think about that for the minute. we are the richest and most powerful country in the world but many american women are living shorter lives than their mothers, especially those with the least education. that is a historic reversal that rivals the decline in life expectancy for russian men after the disintegration of the soviet union. there's no single explanation for why this is happening. prescription drug overdose has spiked, smoking, obesity, poverty. for too many women, the dream of upward mobility, the american dream remains elusive. that is not the way it is supposed to be. i think of
in the other direction and that has begun in academia, campuses, churches, and unions, and a bunch of places where the discourse has changed in many respect but has not yet percolated up to the political level where we live in an unreality zone. unfarm. and before you can get that i think you have top get to the grassroots. >> lady in the second row? >> wait for the microphone. >> i'm glad you mentioned hack -- academia. now that i've been here two years, i'm worried that on campuses they're not changing so much. there's a lot more interest in the arab world but there's less willingness, at least from my vantage point or what i hear or see to reflect on american foreign policy. what do we do about that? >> yeah. okay. >> gentleman in the second row. >> from jaffa. i'm away from my country 65 years. i have just a little question. >> make it one. >> i can't make it -- just a small one. the united states gave sadat $76 million. gave israel 36 billion last year. our people in the gaza. -- before president obama went to the middle east, he sent the message to netanyahu, ask him, tell me the date
in the same-- >> no, what i'm saying, alan, the fact that she can be accepted in academia and the leadership at universities are not calling out these universities. look at all of the professors that just came out against a basketball coach, but you have a woman like this that does something like attack and kill people and i can't find a professor to criticize her. >> why isn't she in jail? >> she served her time for 22 years. >> so she did her time for the-- she did her time, do you not believe someone can do their time, pay their debt to society and become a productive member of society. do you not believe in christian redemption. pay your time for the crime you committed should you be denied to-- >> she killed three cops and-- >> not defending what she did. >> megyn: do you want your kids learning from kathy boudin for anything. >> if someone pays their debt to see site maybe they have something to teach people. we believe in our criminal justice system once you pay your debt, you have a right to move on. >> megyn: there's no he question she has a right to move on, but whether she has a r
by larry mary in the next season of down ton andy. of course, the left wing ivory tower academia-holes out there couldn't stand that conservatives like crockett and tubbs here were right so they proved them wrong. >> the economic theory underpinning austerity policies being followed by governments worldwide may be flawed. that is the allegation made in a study by the university of massachusetts. it claims to have found coding errors on the excel spreadsheet used by the academics who have produced the theory which could invalidate their conclusions. >> stephen: the university of massachusetts found coding errors that invalidate conclusions. nerrrrds! i bet you found them on a friday night with your mom. while the rest of us were going up to the point and drinking p.b.r. i puked in dave con roy's glove compartment. it was a good time. and just look at the poindexter who caught the mistakes. thomas herndon who reviewed their data and immediately spotted a basic spreadsheet error and that they had excluded data from canada, new zealand, australia all countries that are experienced solid growth
a great deal of time in meetings trying to explain to those in charge how things were done in academia. very often, most often, the response was we are not in academia, that is not how we do it which got us into a system of again when i first started working at the war college, everyone, every faculty member was hired as a full professor. in an environment where they are so rank conscious, the idea of hiring people all faculty members as full professor was unheard of to us and it hurt the institutional credibility, trying to explain that to a colonel why they should not inherently be a full professor fell on deaf ears. the problem of having administrators who have no experience is, i think, part of the problem. the other parts of the problem and i will be honest, i am writing a follow-on chapter with another former department chair from the naval war college, we are doing a book chapters that looks at what is the oversight? what is the supervision? there are two basically supervising organizations, something called military education coordinating council. the military of acronyms and c
, that academia is not a place for public intellectuals, rather the whole research/tenure process. makes that impossible. you know, eric erickson came up to teach without any degrees at all in 1960. and the faculty was overwhelmingly opposed. no publications, no degrees. well, childhood in society isn't a real book, so forth. lucky, reeseman told bundy he's probably going to be the best teacher in the history of harvard, which he was. so my fear is, no. elsewhere in the world probably better, but not great. but that doesn't mean we shouldn't try for it. is that okay? >> yep, absolutely. >> yes. >> i loved how you talked about all of them as separate lives that he had over time, and they were really very discreet, actually, some of them overlapped though. have you had any thoughts on if he were to be alive today and with what's going on in the world now, do you think he would have evolved into yet another life or continued a particular one? >> okay, that's -- all i get is easy questions. [laughter] what would happen? i think he'd be very distressed. the way the world's going. the wars, sy
in meetings, trying to explain to those in charge how things were done in academia and very often, most often their response was we are not in academia. that's not how we do it, which got us to a system of when i first started working war college, every faculty member was high up as a full professor. in an environment where they are so right conscious, the idea of hiring people, all faculty members as a full professor is just unheard of and hurt the institutional credibility. trying to explain that to a kernel of why they should not be a full professor fell on ears. this is a problem how to administrators who really have no experience is part of the problem. the other part of the problem and i'll be honest i'll be writing a following chapter of the department chair from the naval war college, captain tony were body are doing a book chapter that was the oversight? with the supervision? there to supervising organizations with something called military education coordinating council -- the military loves acronyms. a part of the pentagon called the g7, part of the joint staff. the congress is bus
in the public debate. >> host: i think it's breaktime. >> host: let's talk a little bit about academia. you see academia as part of the problem in establishing the secular world view. >> guest: that sounds all too familiar. people had said that for some time. where they think that the 1960's was the big radical break and if you do a little research to find the 1860's and that's situation i'm about to describe is how liberalism came to dominatete culture and intellectually. so, that to be educated men to take on the liberal view and not to take on the liberal view must not mean that you were educated. what occurred is a very special circumstance. in europe you've got the development of the universities along the radical enlightenment clients by the time you get to the 1900's. so all the latest radical enlightenment thought had restructured their universities. and the universities were considered the top universities in the world. germany devotees were at the peak. they had really taken a hold of the radical enlightenment which is again a mode of secular liberalism, and in america we didn't have
, and that's begun in places on camp david academia, , churches, unions, a bunch of places where the discourse changed in many republics or beginning to change, but it's not yet percolated up to the political level where we live in an unreality zone, unfortunately, and before you can get to that, you have to get to the grassroots. >> lady in the second row. >> uh-huh, wait for the microphone. >> [inaudible] >> now that i'm teaching in dc and been here for duoyears, at least on campuses, they are in the changing so much. there's a lot more interest in the arab world, but there's less willingness, at least from my vantage point of what i hear and see that reflects on american foreign policy. what do we do about that? >> yeah. okay. >> im away from my country, 65 years. i have just a little question. the first one -- >> make it one. >> i can't make it -- it's just a small one. the united states said 76 billion dollars, what's it up with? they gave them 36 billion last year. attacks our people in gaza. before president obama went to the middle east, sent the message to ben beep, ask
of the issue here academia is going to attract a certain kind of person. i haven't seen where conservative law professors are being rejected. >> do you buy that. >> there is a loft antidotal evidence that conservative law professors have been rejecting. go to a federal society meeting and chances are good you will hear story after story. look, i think it -- i think it's just the way that academia is. it doesn't mean that conservatives shouldn't make strong pushes at every possible juncture and every possible way to get in and to make sure that students are exposed to different ideas. i agree with charles it is important that at least these institutions seem to be making a basic recognition that there is a problem. >> chris: all right. time, friday lightning round for winners and losers. steve, you start. >> my winner is sort of the obvious winner. it's mark sanford. this is somebody the people had written off as having one of the worst falls from grace of an elected official in recent memory. he came back and he won a primary and i think looks pretty well situated to go and win a general elect
a look. >> in berkeley where academia and real world blend together there is a buzz in the air. the girls have done well. >> i know they're doing really good. and hopefully, they'll win. >> california women hoop sisters have exceeded expectations. they upset power house georgia to advance from elite 8 to the final four in the ncaa basketball championships. >> this is a group that believe ootz team began a practice on friendly wood this afternoon they did with hope and confidence. they have won 32 games, lost just three and grown from a group of strangers to a family. now with this stride to new orleans the nation is learning about them too,. >> it's tankable to have in each other. i have never been around a group that believes we're going to get it done and person next to them. >> we just wanted something to believe in. and i think that is what awesome about lindsay. she came in and said look. follow me. i'll lead the way just bring energy. be yourselves. i'll worry about the rest. >> the rest would be university of louisville. they're two wins from immore talt. two wins from a national c
on academia are doing that, not in a partisan way. as soon as you turn to question, it is what are we going to do about it? what kind of policy might make things better. lou: so far, when we're going to do about it has not -- >> not much. lou: has not been much and not exciting. we appreciate it. alan great to have you with us. >> great to be here. lou: up next, immigration reform debate, dividing republicans. our next guest said legal immigration is the real issue ann woulder will be here -- ann coulter will be here, in chalk talk how much of your hard earned tax dollars are benefiting the programs that government tells me that condition,tiotion shouldn't but are. ♪ [ female announcer ] the sun powers life. ♪ and now it powers our latest innovation. ♪ introducing the world's only solar-powered home energy system, ich can t your heating and cooling bills in half. call now to get up to sixteen hundred dollars back or 12 months deferred interest on select lennox home comfort systems. offer ends june 14th. plus download our free lennox mobile app with an energy-savings calculator. ♪ if
forecasting likely outcomes, people on wall street, people on academia are doing that, not in a partisan way. as soon as you turn to question, it is what are we going to do about it? what kind of policy might make things better. lou: so far, when we're going to do about it has not -- >> not much. lou: has not been much and not exciting. we appreciate it. alan great to have you with us. >> great to be here. lou: up next, immigration reform debate, dividing republicans. our next guest said legal immigration is the real issue ann woulder will be here -- ann coulter will be here, in chalk talk how much of your hard earned tax dollars are benefiting the programs that government tells me that condition,tion lou: we've mentioned more than a few times here about shocking increase in food stamps under president obama. when he took office, there were 31.9 million people. 31.9 million people on food stps. now, that number is 47.8 million. that is a 50% spike almost, and it is stunning to think about it. because we have been out of recession come july, we'll have been out of recession for 4 years, and i
're going to do with your life. >> i'm thinking i want to go into academia, so do basically what i'm doing except with better labs. >labs. >> axelrod: not that the one under her bed has limitedccess . >> as human beings we scient because we're curious. we question. that's what science is. >> axelrod: and sarah's talents until the classroom are not limited to being a student. she's not bad as a teacher, either, writing tests and preparing members of her high school's science olympiad team. and that is the cbs evening news for tonight. later on cbs "48 hours." for now, i'm jim axelrod in new york. for all of us here at cbs news, thanks for joining us and good night. ptiong sponsoreds captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org our first look at the man pe are looking for. the bay.t we. thenautiful dn i! e coast guard rescue near candlesti park. "..((15, 8:08:26 - we're ju here to get an opportunity d when and opportunity comes along, we'll be ready for it.))." the america's cup, not justr the yachting elite. the opportunities for dozens of area job seekers. kpix 5 news is next. g
in academia. i wrote about him in 2002 when he was honored with a prestigious rhodes scholarship and just like his parents, kathy and david gilbert and his adoptive parents, bill ayers and bernadine dorn, chester remains unrependant about the violence that the underground perpetrated and is quite proud of his parents and adoptive parents quote, unquote, social justice legacy. >> megyn: now we've got bernadine dorn as you mentioned is with bill ayers at northwestern university and now we've got this prize, miss kathy bodine at columbia and her son is a rhodes scholar and believes in the same ideals as his parents did, and so this -- i don't know, my kids are babies, michelle, but i'm thinking if i sent them to columbia university, a great school, a great school, and i find out that miss bodine who murdered three police officers, two police officers and a security guard, i'm thinking, that's not the course i want you to take. i don't think she has anything to say that you need to hear. >> that's exactly right. and i think that this is a warning for all parents. i think it's a very teachable mome
bodine, angela davis, all of them, communists and they're glorified in academia. >> can i show a shot of jada talking about this about the historical significance of angela davis. >> it is a powerful piece of american history, like people think they h know the story of angela davis. even think that we though all the different aspects of that particular era. but we don't. and i felt like angela davis represented such a a dynamic charismatic figure of this time and she really was in the middle of kind of the building blocks of the america that we seeee today. >> so she's a communist, a marxist, feminist proponent of radical violence and the building block of america today. this is what's scary. these are the peopl,e who shaped history through media. by theop way, a might not media. >> if you look at the very end of that. >> view,a the interviewer -- probably never heard of angela davis in her life and she's like, oh, absolutely. >> remember we used to listening to current tv when al gore did an interview and the people would say, oh, good point. >> 'cause they don't read up on stuff. >>
-- academia, there were some prayer academic who said this is to lock in -- this is coopting into a patriarchal institutions. this is something people wanted. they wanted to settle down. the house with the white picket fence and someone. i think it was not so much that jonathan and andrew sullivan and others argued for this and everyone sort of read the arguments and were convinced. there were kedging of the subpoena was already a real desire within the community and corresponds to a universal human desire for companionship, intimacy, love. >> what do you think is different about -- you talked about the groundwork for the same sex in the opposite sex relationships. let's just leave the lesbians out of that. what do you observe? obviously you have relatives and families and friends who are in opposite sex relationships. have you think -- there are a lot of ways in which there the same. >> opposite sex? >> like loving across the gender divide. >> i think the fact that different sex relationships can create new life this huge. this is something that you talk about in the book. s
some -- and i, you knowings -- knowing i'm academia, there's a queer academic, self-styled queer academic who said this is, you know, co-oping us into pay tree art call institution, but people wanted to settle down, wanted the house with the white picket fence and so on, and i think that it was not so much john and andrew and others arguing for this, and everyone read the arguments convinced and caught on, but responding to something already in the community, but a corresponds to a human desire for companionship, i want ma sigh, and love. >> what do you think is different about, you know, you talked about the ground work for what's the same between same-sex and opposite sex relationships. leave the lesbians out of that because -- obviously, you have relatives, family, and friends in opposite-sex relationships. how do you think -- there's a lot of ways in which they are the same. how do you think they are different? >> how do i think opposite sex and -- >> loving across the gender divide. >> i think the fact that different-sex relationships create new life is huge. that's somethin
black conservatives on networks, but there's a censorship throughout the media and academia. >> sean: if you're a conservative african-american. >> that's right. >> sean: all right. guys, good to see you, thank you, appreciate it. >> thank you. >> sean: and coming up, the rogue regime in north korea ramps up its rhetoric and says there's quote, a state of war in the peninsula. did this crisis sneak up on the administration? patrick j buchanan is here and plus, today marks the 24th straight day that the people's house remains closed to the children and public and crazy uncle joe biden didn't seem to-- he's on a vacation, and where your dollars sent him. [ shapiro ] at legalzoom, you can take care of virtually all your imptant legal matters in just minutes. protect youramily... and launch your dreams. at legalzoom.com we put the law on your side. . >> ichl >> welcome back to "hannity." new tensions tonight over the weekend. kim jong-un said that the korean peninsula entered a quote, state of war and said that nuclear weapons are quote, the nation's life. this ramped up rhetoric did no
's a plumb position. it pays well. there are a lot of people who would like to have it in academia who didn't murder anyone. so if i'm dean, i probably would have selected one of those people over the person who murdered three. even though as you said validly she served her time. am i crazy? >> yes. >> bill: i am? i should hire the convicted killer? >> no. if the convicted killer is the person who is best for the job, absolutely. if they served their time. >> bill: best for the job? >> selectively picking out the constitution there. if she served her time and she did and she went there to apply i assumed she qualified. she got the job. what are you going to do? keep her locked up for the rest of her life? make her sweep streets. >> bill: i don't think double vengeance is what we need. i don't think i would have hired her for that position because i think other people would have deserved it more. interestingly enough, the family of the three murderers the whole family of all three of them are outraged. >> i'm sure they are. >> bill: because she hasn't made any kind of gesture to them financi
, of academia, of media. here's my question. do progressives really follow what they believe in? i believe they actually lead two separate collective lives. the first one is utopia by force, which is what they lecture you about, how you have to live, and then they go home and live their own lives, which then allows them to make you feel guilty about your excesses while participating in lavish parties like you see at the white house. and now you have a white house where you have these parties during tough times. it's not an administration, it's a party bus. >> did you just figure that out is it. >> we're going to talk about that in a second. kimberly, this came across the wire today. white house to furlough assistant chef for sequester. >> can you believe how much sacrifice. >> don't worry, bob's going to make bachelor stew, they'll live off of it for weeks at the white house. >> there's six floors. >> instead -- >> the initial premise of the segment was, how do you hold the collective responsible for all of these awful things. you have elections. but the conservatives are losing elections.
and a very much hollywood scion location for students. and academia itself is liberal. somehow i turned out conservative. i don't know how that happened. >> sherrod, -- >> he sounds like a stupid racist. >> by the way, he hates old blackmails, but what it was black lesbian feminists? >> can't you hate them all? >> there is no law breaking -- you are not breaking a law by hating somebody. if you hate these old white dudes it is all right. you should teachers and both sides of it. show some balance. >> much like fox news. we are fair and balanced. how do you read this? he claims there is an open debate in the classroom, but i don't know if that is possible and if that is the guy grading your papers. >> he is not a good marxist or leftist. he is not even saying anything original. usually you have the college and there were a couple of guys with strange facial hair and they muttered to themselves. they didn't go for the patches. you drink with them and hang out and they were like, if only people took marks seriously. you are like, this guy is legit. a keith olberman speech, that's all it was. >
. bernadine dohrn at northern law. the track record of liberal academia is atrocious. where are the conservative professors, bob. >> bob: jeez, i don't know. i got an idea. how about some of you conservatives go in and teach. >> eric: on the right to come out and say that it's america's fault for the bombing in boston. none of them have. it's liberal, it's theirs. they own it. and it's wrong. >> andrea: eric, there is only a week out. there is time. >> bob: do you think all liberals agree with what this guy says. >> eric: all who said something like that happen to have been liberal. >> bob: i see. >> eric: see? >> bob: when timothy mcveigh attacked the united states. >> eric: done with timothy mcveigh. >> bob: you go back. >> eric: 18 years ago, bob. let's go back to this guy mr. falk. >> kimberly: u.n. most anti-american agencies out there. and you contribute heavily, yes. billions of dollars to give money over to this individual who is one of the people u.n. official. gets paid through them. no, but where he works is partly funded by the u.n. sorry. there are ten particula
, a media fearful of accusation of profiling, academia fearful of accusations of profiling. let's take that last one first. the terror occurred in the ultimate college town. now that the dorm room utopia has been punctured, as one student went from raymen noodles and broiler to ball bearing and pressure cookie, the rest of the socialists face two choices. do you still keep a world view that all cultures are equal and extremism is part of the rainbow that includes violent professors? or do you wake up an recognize the poison in your system? by the way, enough with calling them kids. they're adults. one killed an 8-year-old boy. why we can't rely on the campus, we can also not rely on the f.b.i. old school agents would have crushed the twerps. now they are more like social workers, risk averse and scared to identify evil. they have been infected with the same virus, islamophobia-phobia. terror of the mind to seek to blind you to objective reality around you, in government, media, the schools. who is left to protect us? us. you and me. it's our job to remain symptom-free and quarantine ou
likely outcomes, people on wall street, people on academia are doing that, not in a partisan way. as soon as you turn to question, it is what are we going to do about it? what kind of policy might make things better. lou: so far, when we're going to do abo it has not -- >> not much. lou: has not been much and not exciting. we appreciate it. alan great to have you with us. >> great to be here. lou: up next, immigration reform debate, dividing republicans. our nt guest said legal immigration is the real issue ann woulder will be here -- ann coulter will be here, in chalk talk how much of your hard earned tax dollars are benefiting the programs that governme tells me that condition,tion thank you orville and wilbur... ...amelia... neil and buzz: for teacaching us that you can't create the future... by clinging to the past. and with that: you're history. instead of looking behind... delta is looking beyond. 80 thousand of us investing billions... in everything from the best experiences below... to the finest comforts above. we're not simply saluting history... we're making it. at od, whatever
can stop spinning the same whale of would jumpstart academia i hope. >> so let's talk a little bit between the tie between religion and political thought. is the political liberalism i think gross with christianity equates >> some liberals wouldn't he. another is to have to say i'm talking about a large-scale historical movement. back when people mix and match stats. xm to be coherent. a lot of times they drag things and from left to right. the large-scale movement cnn compatibility people but to the sources. once you go back to somebody like machiavelli, hobbes, you go back to somebody election of a and the late 1600s or most obviously rousseau said christianity was a mistake. get it out of here. you see what it means to be at the bottom fundamentally antagonistic to christianity and thoroughly antagonistic. they understand what is at stake here in rejecting christianity full force. so that it be the kind of thing needed intellectually to say, where did the actual modes of thought conflicts? how a secular liberalism self defined come self-consciously defined against christianity?
was shouted down. this is what's going on in academia. it's not just in the universities, it's through our educational system, because the left knows if you want to control tomorrow, you control today's children. >> i went to baylor university, which is a baptist university -- >> sean: what happened? >> i went as a conservative, and came out a liberal. it was conservative, too. i mean, there was a certain philosophy -- >> sean: explain to me why it's such a bad thing to -- for everybody who goes into a voting booth, we want integrity in our system, tell me why voter id is such an awful thing, a racist thing, as many on the left accuse those that want -- >> i would encourage to have the voting open for all. i would like to have it on saturday. >> sean: what about ids? why not everybody have an id? >> because that does discriminate. >> sean: what's wrong with an id so we know that the person that's voting is the person they say are? >> i would say there's nothing wrong with an id, and i don't think there's anything wrong with a background check if you have a gun. >> this professor was accusi
it because you've got three obstacles; academia, hollywood and our major media, all of which are overwhelmingly liberal. when you say something, it's got to be interpreted through the filter of those three entities, and often it's been distorted. >> host: larry elder is our guest, this is booktv on c-span2 live from the los angeles times festival of books, campus of usc. mike's in fort worth, texas. hi, mike. >> caller: how's it going, larry? my -- pretty good. i'm a african-american democrat, but i agree with you one of the big problems in the african-american community is lack of fathers in the house. but i think, larry, when you say that, you kind of come off kind of harsh on black people. now, what's the reason behind the lack of a lot of fathers being in the house, drinking or in prison? well, back -- this is my belief. back in the '30s and '40s black people were lawyers, they had their own businesses like your father had that restaurant. today had, they were dentists -- they had, they were dentists, we had a lot of grocery stores because there was segregation, and we co
accusations they're profiling, a media fearfulns of accusations they're profiling and an academia fearful off accusations of profiling. let's take thaiot last one firs. the terror occurred in the ultimate college town. now that this dorm room utopia has been punctured as one student went from ram en noodles, the rest of the socialists face two choices. do you still keep that world view that all cultures are equal and that extremism is just part of the rainbow that alreadye includes violent professors? or do you wake up and recognizea the poison in your system? by the way, enough with calling them kids. they're adults. one killed an eight-year-old boy. so why we can't rely on the campus, we can also not rely on the f.b.i old school agents would have crushed these we weres. but know they're more likew social workers, risk averse andr scared to identify evil. they've all been infected with islamaphobia, it's a terror of the mind that seeks to blind you to the objective reality aroundo you. it's in government, the media, the schools. who is left to protect us? us. you and me. it'sd our job to re
up. melissa: there is a huge fight brewing in the hallowed halls of academia putting scholars from the university of massachusetts pitted against harvard? oh, no. our country's dent to gdp ratio is above 100%. that is not good no matter how you slice it. a group from the university of massachusetts says it is actually the opposite. don't know how that is possible. with me now is one of the professors that debunked it all. a former umass, amherst. we also have from, umass amherst and steve moore a member of "the wall street journal" editorial board. professor, let me start with you. so you take apart this study that carmen reinhardt and ken rogoff put together. first error you found was a doozy. it was mathematical. they made mistakes in their xcel spreadsheet. >> they did. i wasn't to say it wasn't just me. myself with my coauthors thomas herndon, who is a graduate student and my colleague, michael ash. that was the first problem. the problem was they simply calculated wrong off their spreadsheet scheidt. melissa: okay, so their response to that was, has been, we do, we do not beli
peaceful uses of nuclear materials in commercial enterprise, in medicine, and academia provide important societal benefits. the civilian nuclear landscape has the potential to change considerably in the coming years. some country, as you know, are seeking to expand small existing nuclear power programs. others are developed countries that have identified a need to diversify their energy mix, still others, which the iaea expressed some interest in nuclear power have significant work ahead to establish the basic critical infrastructure. of course, thed a vented of small reactor designs could lead to the introduction of nuclear power in places of small or regional grids that may not otherwise have considered it. the development of any major new technological advancement can come with competing or conflicting objective. nuclear technology with improve people's health and livelihood, as we know. it's understandable that governments would put want to put access on the fast track. this they outpace the development of regulatory control, safety, security and environmental projections are jeopard
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